Missing Teeth Predict Strokes

Missing Teeth Predict Strokes

“Number of missing teeth at baseline was associated directly with higher levels of several established CVD risk factors, as shown in Table 1. A significant and linear relationship between a risk factor and missing-teeth group was found for age, educa- tion years (inverse), body mass index, HDL cholesterol (inverse), triglycerides, C-reactive protein, male sex, existing DM, and either parent having AMI or DM. Systolic blood pres- sure, gamma-glutamyl transferase, and cholesterol showed no significant trends due to high standard deviation values. Smokers were equally distributed between among teeth groups, with a group-specific prevalence of 40% to 48%. Total intake of energy, carbohydrates, proteins, and fat did not differ sig- nificantly across missing-teeth categories when adjusted for age, sex, and education years.

We investigated the characteristics of subjects with and without incident CVD and further explored subjects with inci- dent CHD events, AMI, or stroke (Table 2). In sum, 9.9% of the studied population developed incident CVD in the 13-y follow- up. All CVD risk factors were significantly different between subjects with and without incident CVD. Presence of DM was 3.5 times more common in subjects having CVD, of which 70% were men. The risk factors showed similar patterns in the sub- groups of CVD (CHD events, AMI, and stroke; data not shown).”

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